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Public Records

Californians have the right under the state Public Records Act and the California Constitution to access public information maintained by local and state government agencies, including the Department of Justice.

The following are guidelines for accessing public, pdf records maintained by the California Department of Justice. To obtain records of another agency, please contact the agency directly.

CRIMINAL HISTORY INFORMATION

For information about your arrests and convictions regarding any of the following topics:

MEGAN’S LAW

Megan’s Law permits the public to obtain information on sex offenders.

SUPERIOR COURT RECORDS

The DOJ does not maintain or provide certified copies of California Local and/or Superior Court Records and as such, does not provide these source documents. To obtain a transcript, you will need to contact the court with jurisdiction over your particular case(s) for certified documents.

CONSUMER INFORMATION

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Prior to making a Public Records Act request, the information in the following Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) may be helpful.

ACCESSING DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (DOJ) RECORDS

  • Identifying records: To help us provide records promptly, please provide specific information about the records you seek including the record name, subject matter, and location within the office if known.
  • Time Deadlines: The DOJ has 10 days to determine if it will disclose the requested records. A limited 14-day extension may apply. If records cannot be provided within these deadlines, we will provide an estimated delivery date, and the records will be disclosed in a reasonable period of time.
  • Copying Fees: The DOJ charges 10 cents per page as the direct cost for duplicating records. When the DOJ must compile or extract electronic data or perform computer programming, it may charge its full costs.
  • Exemptions: The DOJ will provide access to all public records upon request, unless the law provides an exemption from mandatory disclosure. Examples of exempt records may include: personnel records, investigative records, drafts, confidential legal advice, records prepared in connection with litigation, and information that may be kept confidential under other state or federal laws. Usually, when the DOJ removes or redacts exempt information, it will disclose the remainder of the record.
  • Online Form: The best way to request a copy of DOJ records is to complete an online request form. This form goes directly to the Public Records Ombudsman who is charged with facilitating the DOJ’s response to record requests.

Megan's Law

California Registered Sex Offender Database

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